Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a blood-borne viral infection which can, over decades, lead to liver fibrosis (scarring), cirrhosis, and in some patients, liver cancer and death. It is transmitted through blood-to-blood contact, and in rare cases, sexual transmission. Approximately 4 million Americans have chronic hepatitis C; however, only 25 to 30% have been diagnosed. The diagnosis is made by specific laboratory (blood) testing. Liver biopsy may be recommended to assess the degree of fibrosis and need for treatment.

Hepatitis C is curable and treatment for most people is 12 weeks, although some people can achieve cure with only 8 weeks of treatment and others may require 24 weeks. Cure rates for almost all patients range from 90-100%, depending on the hepatitis C genotype (strain) and severity of liver disease. Previously, treatment consisted of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, which resulted in viral clearance in approximately 50% of those patients treated. Fortunately for patients, none of regimens used to cure hepatitis C today include interferon.

Learn more about how HEP supports people in testing for hepatitis C!

Learn more about how HEP supports people in supporting people getting treated for hepatitis C!

Help 4 Hep

Non-profit peer-to-peer helpline, in English.

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Hepatitis C Online (UW)

Website with trainings, in English.

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Plan to Eliminate Hepatitis C in Washington State by 2030

PDF file, in English.

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Patient assistance programs for Healthcare

Resource directory, in English.

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Medical Case Management Toolkit (HEP)

PDF file, in English.

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